Daily News

New Project: New Life Sciences Center In Manhattan

October 18, 2020

Source: Crain's New York

 

The New York Blood Center has announced plans to build a new $750 million center on the city’s Upper East Side.


Who is Involved?

Developers: Longfellow Real Estate Partners

Designers: Ennead Architects


Where is it happening?

Manhattan, New York


When is it happening?

Construction is expected to break ground at the end of 2022 and top out in mid-2026.


Why is it important?

The new structure will allow the non-profit to increase blood product production by a third and expand out from its currently under-sized facility.


Key Aspects?

First five floors will be occupied by The Blood Center

Floors seven through 16 will be occupied by life-science tenants.

 

Building Specs?

16-stories tall

596,000 square-feet of total space

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